Is It Ok to Flush Tampons

Is It Ok to Flush Tampons? Generally, it is best to wrap a used tampon in toilet paper or facial tissue and throw it in the trash. Small bags are also sold to wrap used menstrual products before disposal.

Disposing of this waste in outgoing dustbins and handling typically should not result in exposure to people’s blood.

Women who prefer to flush their used tampons rather than throw them in the trash are usually concerned with unpleasant odors in the bin, leaving behind an unpleasant sight and anomaly, especially in public restrooms where frequent It happens that liners are missing in the trash.

It may seem like the easiest and best option for women and people cleaning public toilets is to flush, but given how many problems it causes, it may not be the best way to dispose of our tampons. The team of Tampons and Menstrual Cups also tested it.

The most obvious issue is plumbing – pads and tampons often cause clogging, which costs not only money but time and a headache or two. For this reason, public toilets usually have signs reminding guests not to throw anything but toilet paper into the toilet bowl.

While tampons are small enough to flush the toilet without clogging, they sometimes clog your home’s plumbing.

Worse yet, tampons and other menstrual products cause long-term blockages in sewer systems and become environmental hazards when they enter oceans and other waterways.

Flush menstrual products are an especially strange problem in the United States.

In the U.K, people flush more than 2.5 million tampons down the toilet in a day.

This is particularly bad news, given that most mainstream tampons and menstrual pads are made partially or entirely of plastic. Tampon applicators, especially plastic applicators, are also a big problem.

You should only flush the three P’s: pee, poop, and toilet paper. Everything else should go in the trash.

In general, OSHA does not consider discarded menstrual products a regulated waste. It also does not consider the presence of tampons and other menstrual products discarded under normal conditions to trigger the norm of bloodborne pathogens.

In the workplace, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) expects used menstrual products, including tampons, to be discarded in inlined waste containers so that the container does not contact the contents.

Is It Ok to Flush Tampons?

No, It is not ok to flush tampons. Tampons can cause plumbing blockages that can lead to sewage backflow, resulting in health hazards and costly repairs. Flush only human waste and toilet paper.

Usually used tampons are wrapped in facial tissue or toilet paper and thrown in the trash.

Although it may seem like a tampon will break easily in the sewer, this is not true. In fact, since the main job of tampons is to be absorbent, they are precisely designed to prevent breakage when exposed to water. This is good news for preventing period leaks, but bad news for your plumbing.

There are many negative effects that improperly disposed of menstrual waste has on public infrastructure, health and the environment.

Is It Ok to Flush Tampons
Is it ok to flush tampons

Why Shouldn’t You Flush Tampons?

Tampons and other menstrual products are usually made of very absorbent material. When flushed, these products can become entangled in plumbing pipes and/or become saturated with liquid, swell, and become trapped in your plumbing.

This can cause blockages that result in sewage backflow into your home, a serious health hazard, and costly repairs.

If they extend it beyond your home’s plumbing, they can clog your hometown’s sewer system, potentially resulting in sewage spilling into streets, basements, and local waterways.

So how can an innocent tampon harm your sewer system? Finlay explains that there are three main wastewater systems you should worry about.

First, tampons and other menstrual products can clog the plumbing system in your home, causing anything from an awkwardly clogged toilet to a several-hundred-dollar trip to the plumber.

Next, the lateral is a pipe that connects the plumbing of your apartment or house to the overall sewer system.

Menstrual products may accumulate laterally, preventing waste from flowing properly into the sewer system. If you own your home, lateral maintenance is your responsibility, and fixing a closed lateral can be costly.

Do Tampons Clog Toilets?

Tampons can clog your toilet because they are designed to absorb and hold liquid. When exposed to liquids, tampons can expand to about 10 times their size.

Unlike toilet paper, tampons never break. This makes them problematic for any plumbing system.

Can I Flush Tampons If I Have a Septic Tank?

No, You can not flush tampons if you have a septic tank. If you are using 100% cotton tampons, these can biodegrade in a septic tank after a long time, or composting toilet.

If you’re using traditional tampons, which are usually made of plastic overwraps that interfere with tampon breakdown and biodegrading.

If you have a sewer system instead of a septic system, the wastewater flows into the sewage utility and into the wastewater treatment plant, where it will be circulated through screens.

Tampons and other hygiene products, such as wipes, are common culprits in clogging these screens. And when it does, it can be a real nightmare for workers.

I’ve Been Flushing Tampons for Years

Flushing tampons down the toilet is not only bad for the environment but can also cause costly plumbing problems. Over time, blockages can result in exorbitant plumbing repair costs for renters or those living in single-family homes.

And last but not least, flushing the tampon down the toilet is also not recommended as it can pose a health hazard if you are prone to infection with bacteria.

Can You Flush Tampons in an Apartment

No, You can not flush tampons in an apartment because the sewerage system of the apartment is connected from one house to another. If a sewer blockage occurs due to tampons or menstrual cups in one house, it can clog the flushing system of many apartment houses.

Can You Flush Tampons in the City

No, You can not flush tampons with city water. It can block the toilet or bathroom sewer system. So, It is not safe to flush tampons in the city. It can clog the sewer system.

Is Flushing Tampons Bad for the Environment

Yes, flushing tampons are bad for the environment. The tampon you flush down the toilet not only clogs up the sewer screen and becomes a fatberg; They can also enter the ocean.

Environmental advocates report a serious problem with washing up plastic tampon applicators on beaches.

During a summer beach cleanup in New Jersey, advocates found 3,000 of them.

Our towns and cities are designed to deal with two types of water: rainwater and wastewater.

Since rainwater is unpredictable, sewers are designed to allow overflow when it has rained too much for the system to maintain.

But when wastewater and stormwater are channeled into the same swarm system, the pollution also gets carried away along with the water.

When they overflow it’s not just storming water, but things that overflow.

Some sewer systems have grinders or choppers designed to help move household waste through the sewer system.

When they grind tampons or menstrual pads, they can create tiny bits of plastic that will enter wastewater treatment plants, and eventually natural bodies of water.

Are 100% Cotton Tampons Flushable?

Yes, 100% cotton tampons are flushable. You can flush the tampons if it is 100% made with cotton. Tampons that are made with 100% cotton, can biodegrade in composting toilets or septic tanks. Organic Plant-Based Tampons and Cora Organic Tampons are made with 100% cotton.

Can You Flush Plastic Tampon Applicators

No, You can not flush plastic tampon applicators. It is made with plastic and blocks your toilet or bathroom system if you try to flush it. It is also unsafe for the environment.

Takeaway

While 100% cotton tampons and pads lack the harmful plastics that can make traditional products a particular environmental hazard, they still don’t break down in water fast enough to be truly sewer-system-safe.

The same goes for biodegradable pads, which are a more sustainable alternative to plastics but which still require more time to biodegrade than a traditional sewer system allows.

Since most commercial tampons are made of rayon, cotton, and plastic, these types of tampons will have to go in the trash.

To properly dispose of a tampon, wrap it in toilet paper or its own wrapper, then put it in the trash. If you are in a public toilet, it is best to throw it in the sanitary napkin bin.

To avoid creating waste almost entirely, consider switching to reusable products like period panties and menstrual cups.

If you’re using a natural, organic tampon made entirely from cotton, you may have the option of composting it.

But be sure to check out the tampon brand’s unique instructions first to find out.

Tampons made from 100% cotton can be added to your household compost and will take five to six months to fully biodegrade.

If you want to continue using tampons, you can also reduce plastic waste by using tampons without an applicator.

If you have any questions about tampons and menstrual cups you can comment below in the comment box.

General FAQ’s

Is It Ok to Flush Tampons?

No, It is not ok to flush tampons. Tampons can cause plumbing blockages that can lead to sewage backflow, resulting in health hazards and costly repairs. Flush only human waste and toilet paper.

Why Shouldn’t You Flush Tampons?

Tampons and other menstrual products are usually made of very absorbent material. When flushed, these products can become entangled in plumbing pipes and become saturated with liquid, swell, and become trapped in your plumbing.

Can I Flush Tampons If I Have a Septic Tank?

No, You can not flush tampons if you have a septic tank. If you are using 100% cotton tampons, these can biodegrade in a septic tank after a long time, or composting toilet.

Can You Flush Tampons in an Apartment

No, You can not flush tampons in an apartment. Because the sewerage system of the apartment is connected from one house to another. If a sewer blockage occurs due to tampons or menstrual cups in one house, it can clog the flushing system of many apartment houses.

Can You Flush Tampons in the City

No, You can not flush tampons with city water. It can block the toilet or bathroom sewer system. So, It is not safe to flush tampons in the city. It can clog the sewer system.

Is Flushing Tampons Bad for the Environment

Yes, flushing tampons are bad for the environment. The tampon you flush down the toilet not only clogs up the sewer screen and becomes a fatberg; They can also enter the ocean.

Are 100% Cotton Tampons Flushable?

Yes, 100% cotton tampons are flushable. You can flush the tampons if it is 100% made with cotton. Only made with cotton tampons are flushable.

Can You Flush Plastic Tampon Applicators

No, You can not flush plastic tampon applicators. It is made with plastic and blocks your toilet or bathroom system if you try to flush it. It is also unsafe for the environment.